Examining audiology students' clinical collaboration skills when using virtual audiology cases aided with no collaboration, live collaboration, and virtual collaboration

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Authors
Shaaban, Ramy
Richburg, Cynthia M.
Advisors
Issue Date
2022-03-03
Type
Article
Keywords
Audiology , Clinical competence , Humans , Students
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Journal Issue
Citation
Shaaban, R., &; Richburg, C. M. (2021, December 19). Examining audiology students' clinical collaboration skills when using Virtual Audiology Cases Aided with no collaboration, live collaboration, and virtual collaboration. ASHA Wire. Retrieved April 6, 2022, from https://pubs.asha.org/doi/10.1044/2021_AJA-21-00052
Abstract

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine students' ability to use effective clinical collaboration online in a designed scaffolded environment. Three groups were formed to achieve this goal: two control groups (one using no collaboration and one using live, face-to-face collaboration) and one treatment group using virtual collaboration.

Method: A quasi-experimental design was conducted at two U.S. universities to examine whether there is a significant difference in clinical reasoning skills between three treatment groups using IUP Audiosim software. Two computer-based audiology case simulations were developed, and participants were randomly placed into the three groups. The clinical reasoning data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc analyses.

Results: The results indicated that there was a significant difference in clinical reasoning skills between the three treatment groups. The score obtained by the no-collaboration group was significantly less than the scores obtained by the virtual and live collaboration groups.

Conclusions: The results imply that lower scores were associated with students receiving more instructor-designed content and higher scores with students receiving less instructor-designed content. Students who received more scaffolds with the collaborations may have demonstrated better decision-making outside the training exercise than those who did not receive scaffolds. However, lower scores on the exercise did not necessarily imply lower skill. Lower scores simply implied a different path toward mastery.

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Description
Open Access PDF. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Publisher
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Journal
Book Title
Series
American Journal of Audiology;2022
PubMed ID
DOI
ISSN
1059-0889
1558-9137
EISSN