Acute effects of five-toed shoes on postural SWAY

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Authors
Epps, Elizabeth J.
Staab, Carina A.
Patterson, Jeremy A.
Advisors
Issue Date
2013-05
Type
Abstract
Keywords
Research Projects
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Journal Issue
Citation
Epps, Elizabeth J.; Staab, Carina A.; Patterson, Jeremy A. 2013. Acute effects of five-toed shoes on postural SWAY. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 45:no. 5:pp 677-677:Supplement: 1 Meeting Abstract: 2852
Abstract

The latest trend in athletic footwear is the five-toed running shoes. There are claims that the five-toed shoes will help develop strength and mechanical efficiency. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine if an acute difference exists in postural sway between three different conditions; barefoot (BF), five-toed shoes (FT), and traditional running shoes (RS) without previous experience wearing five-toed shoes. METHODS: 49 healthy individuals (18 male, 31 female; avg. age = 23.12±2.63) performed a bilateral, tandem, and single leg balance tests with each of the three conditions (BF, FT, RS). All balance assessments were 10-second measures with eyes closed. A commercially available Smartphone with an application that accesses accelerometer outputs was used to determine postural sway. One trial was completed for each condition with a 4-minute rest between trials. RESULTS: No differences were observed between barefoot and five-toed shoes (p=0.576), barefoot and athletic shoes (p=0.521), or five-toed shoes and athletic shoes (p=0.901). CONCLUSIONS: For individuals with no previous experience wearing five-toed shoes there is no change in postural sway when compared to being barefoot or wearing traditional athletic shoes. This study assessed balance in individuals wearing five-toed shoes for the first time; further research should be conducted on balance and other parameters after a period of training with this type of footwear to assess the claims of improved mechanical efficiency.


The latest trend in athletic footwear is the five-toed running shoes. There are claims that the five-toed shoes will help develop strength and mechanical efficiency.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if an acute difference exists in postural sway between three different conditions; barefoot (BF), five-toed shoes (FT), and traditional running shoes (RS) without previous experience wearing five-toed shoes.METHODS: 49 healthy individuals (18 male, 31 female; avg. age = 23.12±2.63) performed a bilateral, tandem, and single leg balance tests with each of the three conditions (BF, FT, RS). All balance assessments were 10-second measures with eyes closed. A commercially available Smartphone with an application that accesses accelerometer outputs was used to determine postural sway. One trial was completed for each condition with a 4-minute rest between trials.RESULTS: No differences were observed between barefoot and five-toed shoes (p=0.576), barefoot and athletic shoes (p=0.521), or five-toed shoes and athletic shoes (p=0.901).CONCLUSIONS: For individuals with no previous experience wearing five-toed shoes there is no change in postural sway when compared to being barefoot or wearing traditional athletic shoes. This study assessed balance in individuals wearing five-toed shoes for the first time; further research should be conducted on balance and other parameters after a period of training with this type of footwear to assess the claims of improved mechanical efficiency.

Table of Contents
Description
Publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Journal
Book Title
Series
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise;v.45:no.5
PubMed ID
DOI
ISSN
0195-9131
EISSN