Ceramic Art: The Ability to Transgress Time

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Authors
Eames, Matthew
Advisors
Adler, Ted
Issue Date
2011-05-04
Type
Conference paper
Keywords
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Journal Issue
Citation
Eames, Matthew (2011). Ceramic Art: The Ability to Transgress Time. -- In Proceedings: 7th Annual Symposium: Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects. Wichita, KS: Wichita State University, p. 65-66
Abstract

Being comprised of specific minerals and earthen materials, clay has been used throughout history to create art. What distinguishes clay from any other material is its resistance to decay. Through the ceramic firing process, the earthen matter releases their physical and chemical water molecules, reducing the material to a hardened substance. The higher the temperature the denser the material becomes allowing for a lifetime spanning millenniums. In either of these states, clay or ceramic, the materials used would never be able to deteriorate through any biological reduction. This comparison of time and process allows for my metaphorical interpretation of ceramics as fossils. When referencing fossilized matter, its process holds a direct correlation to time. A fossil is a representation of a history, a memory into our past. Once clay has been properly vitrified in a ceramic vessel, I am metaphorically interpreting it as a fossilized remnant of its original mineral structure. When clay is formed into ceramic works of art, a fossilization of nature's own resources occurs; creating a timeline of historic memories, visions, and the evolution of human perception.

Table of Contents
Description
Paper presented to the 7th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects (GRASP) held at the Marcus Welcome Center, Wichita State University, May 4, 2011.
Research completed at the Department of Ceramics
Publisher
Wichita State University. Graduate School
Journal
Book Title
Series
GRASP
v.7
PubMed ID
DOI
ISSN
EISSN