Molecular interactions between medicago truncatula and macrophomina phaseolina

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Authors
Gaige, Andres Reyes
Shuai, Bin
Issue Date
2009-05-01
Type
Conference paper
Language
en_US
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Abstract

Macrophomina phaseolina is a soil-borne fungal pathogen that causes a disease commonly known as charcoal rot. Currently, there is not an effective method for controlling the disease, because knowledge about the pathogen, the development of the disease and how it interacts with the plant host is limited. Therefore, a study is proposed to investigate the interactions between M. phaseolina and the plant species Medicago truncatula using a molecular genetics approach where the host genes involved in the disease development will be identified. We will first conduct a genetic screen in a mutant population of M. truncatula and look for strains that have altered susceptibility to M. phaseolina. We will then identify the genes that are involved in host-pathogen interactions.

Description
Paper presented to the 5th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects (GRASP) held at the Hughes Metropolitan Complex, Wichita State University, May 1, 2009.
Research completed at the Department of Biological Sciences, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Citation
Gaige, Andres Reyes and Bin Shuai(2009). Molecular interactions between Medicago truncatula and Macrophomina phaseolina. In Proceedings: 5th Annual Symposium: Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects. Wichita, KS: Wichita State University, p. 98-99
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Wichita State University. Graduate School
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