Industrial facility nonprocess energy life cycle information

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Authors
Bawaneh, Khaled
Advisors
Twomey, Janet M.
Overcash, Michael
Issue Date
2011-12
Type
Dissertation
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Abstract

In this study, published information on nonprocess energy use, which includes lighting, heating, cooling, ventilation, humidity control, and particulate control, for industrial buildings has been analyzed and compiled and then represented in power intensity (W/ft2). More than thirty different sources of data related to industrial building energy use (covering about 82 buildings) were identified and analyzed. The overall objective of this research is to establish benchmark representative ranges (minimum, mean, medium, maximum) of nonprocess energy consumed by an industrial facility. That information will be used in life cycles of industrial products. The industrial manufacturing buildings were classified into six categories according to nonprocess energy use. This research also investigated the climate zones influence on nonprocess energy use in industrial buildings. The hypothesis tested in this research is: if an industrial building has a characteristic nonprocess energy related to physical dimensions and desired comfort level, then using cooling degrees day (CDD) and heating degrees day (HDD) factors can normalize the measured nonprocess temperature control data for the climate zone differences. The mean, median, standard deviation and total nonprocess energies for current and zone-adjusted nonprocess energy for each facility in this study were calculated. Finally, five industrial facilities were visited and the energy data for these facilities were collected. The nonprocess power intensity for the various nonprocess energy uses was calculated for each facility, based on the actual facility energy bills and measurements. Four separate analysis techniques were used to estimate the nonprocess energy for these facilities as a means to critically understand this information.

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Thesis (Ph.D.)--Wichita State University, College of Engineering, Dept. of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
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Wichita State University
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