Necessary "others" in American public schools: Stories of students with juvenile records

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Issue Date
2018-05
Embargo End Date
Authors
Arends, Kristi D.
Advisor
Patterson, Jean A.
Citation
Abstract

For decades federal and state agencies have reformed criminal and juvenile justice laws to reduce recidivism rates in the United States. Based on successes adult populations have experienced exiting the system using a Risk-Need-Response approach, a similar measure has been applied to juveniles. However, the data suggests mixed results. One reason for the differences between adult and juvenile success rates may be related to the unique experiences juveniles have in schools. Using a narrative inquiry and co-researcher methodology, this study used critical social theory and the theory of othering to examine juvenile experiences returning to school after juvenile justice involvement.

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Description
Thesis (Ed.D.)-- Wichita State University, College of Education, Dept. of Counseling, Educational Leadership, Education and School Psychology
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