The effects of tactile and verbal cues on hip extension strength and broad jump distance

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Authors
Reeves, Matthew
Waterson, Ryan
Kropp, Wyatt
Koester, Bryson
Daniels, Terra
Advisors
Lehecka, B.J.
Issue Date
2023-04-14
Type
Abstract
Keywords
Research Projects
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Citation
Reeves, Matthew; Waterson, Ryan; Kropp, Wyatt; Koester, Bryson; Daniels, Terra. 2023. The effects of tactile and verbal cues on hip extension strength and broad jump distance. -- In Proceedings: 19th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects. Wichita, KS: Wichita State University
Abstract

Purpose: Several studies have demonstrated the effects of verbal and tactile cues on upper extremity muscle strength, while relatively few examined lower extremity muscles, specifically the gluteals. The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of verbal and tactile cues on gluteal strength and broad jump distance. Methods: 42 participants between the age of 18-35 were recruited (22 male, 20 female). Participants received a tactile cue or verbal cue during prone hip extension and standing broad jump in a randomized order. Gluteus maximus strength was measured using handheld dynamometry. Verbal cues included "push, push, push" prior to both tests. Tactile cues included manual contact to the gluteus maximus by the researcher prior to strength testing, and by the participant prior to broad jumps. Results: Verbal cues increased hip extension strength by 13.5%, and both verbal and tactile cues resulted in significant increases in broad jump distance (4% and 3% respectively), with no significant differences observed between male and female participants in either condition. All measures showed high reliability (0.97-0.99). Conclusion: Both females and males significantly benefited from the use of cueing during hip extension and standing broad jump. These results have implications for clinical testing and athletic performance when gluteus maximus strength and jump distance are concerned. The primary limitation of this study was potential fatigue. Further research into the effects of verbal and tactile cueing could include a broader population and other outcomes that target the gluteus maximus including actual sport performance.

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Description
People's Choice award winner in the poster presentations at the 19th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects (GRASP) held at the Rhatigan Student Center, Wichita State University, April 14, 2023.
Research completed in the Department of Physical Therapy, College of Health Professions.
Publisher
Wichita State University
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Series
GRASP
v. 19
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