Pain, disability, and pain/disability relationships in seven rheumatic disorders: a study of 1,522 patients

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Authors
Hawley, Donna J.
Wolfe, Frederick
Advisors
Issue Date
1991-10
Type
Article
Keywords
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't , Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Journal Issue
Citation
The Journal of rheumatology. 1991 Oct; 18(10): 1552-7.
Abstract

We studied the pain, Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire functional disability, pain/disability ratio, and psychological scores in 1,522 patients with rheumatic disease with 7 distinct disorders. Individual differences between patients were more striking than differences among diagnostic groups. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) had the greatest disability, least pain, lowest pain/disability ratio, and least abnormal psychological scores. Highest pain and psychological distress was noted in low back pain, neck pain, and fibromyalgia (axial disorders). Disability in activities of daily living was as high in fibromyalgia as in RA, but low in axial skeletal disorders. There appears to be a continuum for disability that begins with axial but not articular disease (neck and back pain) and ends with multiple articular and periarticular involvement (RA and fibromyalgia).

Table of Contents
Description
Full text of this article is not available in SOAR.
Publisher
Journal of Rheumatology Publishing
Journal
Book Title
Series
The Journal of Rheumatology
J. Rheumatol.
PubMed ID
DOI
ISSN
0315-162X
EISSN