The role of skin complexion on African American emerging adults

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Issue Date
2018-04-27
Embargo End Date
Authors
Bey, Alissa N.
Advisor
Lewis, Rhonda K.
Citation

Bey, Alissa. 2018. The role of skin complexion on African American emerging adults -- In Proceedings: 14th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects. Wichita, KS: Wichita State University, p. 14

Abstract

It is important to explore the role of skin complexion to diminish the social equity gap between various skin complexions discussed in the literature by Keith & Herring (1991), Edwards (1972), and Hunter (2007) & Hunter (2013) to foster a better understanding of psychological well-being for individuals in the African-American community. This qualitative study expands on the skin complexion literature using a Critical Race lens to explore colorism throughout the lifespan of African-American emerging adults. A brief survey was also used to gather information about the participants' current well-being, self-perception of skin complexion, and satisfaction level with skin complexion. In addition, focus groups were conducted with 14 African-American emerging adult college students aged of 18 to 26 to gather information regarding how skin complexion has played a role throughout their lifespan until emerging adulthood. After examining participants' responses, five themes were found within the data: 1) gender matters, 2) mate selection bias, 3) family dynamics, 4) media, and 5) resilience. These themes are used to discuss implications for intervention. We suggest that future researchers explore these themes with participants who have a broader range of skin complexion identifications.

Table of Content
Description
Presented to the 14th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects (GRASP) held at the Rhatigan Student Center, Wichita State University, April 27, 2018.
Research completed in the Department of Psychology, Fairmount College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
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