Maggot debridement therapy in the treatment of nonhealing chronic wounds

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Authors
Martin, Dodie
Pitetti, Kenneth H.
Advisors
Issue Date
2007-04-27
Type
Conference paper
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Research Projects
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Citation
Martin, Dodie & Pitetti, Kenneth H. (2007).Maggot debridement therapy in the treatment of non healing chronic wounds. In Proceedings : 3rd Annual Symposium : Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects. Wichita, KS : Wichita State University, p.133-134
Abstract

Background: Maggot therapy utilizes freshly emerged, sterile larvae of the common greenbottle fly, Phaenicia (Lucilia) sericata which secrete digestive enzymes that selectively dissolve necrotic tissue, disinfect the wound, and thus stimulate wound healing. Introduction: The purpose of this paper was to review the literature in an attempt to determine the efficacy of maggot debridement therapy (MDT) of skin ulcers (e.g. diabetic foot ulcers, venous stasis, osteomyelitis), with specific focus on assessing the healing time and amputation rate. Methodology: Efficacy was measured by comparing MDT to traditional treatment (i.e., antibiotics and surgical debridement). Level of evidence included case-control, cohort retrospective, retrospective, prospective control, non-randomized in-vivo, and report studies. Results: Overall results of the thirteen articles that met the inclusion criteria indicate that MDT healing time was equal to or significantly shorter and amputation rate was less than traditional treatment. Limitations: Limitations to these studies include minimal amount of subjects involved in each study, the inability to conduct randomized control studies and insufficient number of articles found. Conclusion: Preliminary studies confirm that MDT successfully accelerates debridement of long-standing chronic wounds leading to enhanced healing time and reduced amputation rates, making it a particularly safe and affective method in wound care.

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Description
Paper presented to the 3rd Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects (GRASP) held at the Hughes Metropolitan Complex, Wichita State University, April 27, 2007.
Research completed at the Department of Physician Assistant, College of Health Professions
Publisher
Wichita State University. Graduate School.
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GRASP
v.3
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