The effects of video game experience and active stereoscopy on performance in combat identification tasks

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Authors
Keebler, Joseph R.
Jentsch, Florian
Schuster, David
Issue Date
2014-11-13
Type
Article
Language
en_US
Keywords
Combat identification , Decision making , Active stereoscopic displays , Video game experience , Learning and memory , Training technologies
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Abstract

Objective. We investigated the effects of active stereoscopic simulation-based training and individual differences in video game experience on multiple indices of combat identification (CID) performance.

Background. Fratricide is a major problem in combat operations involving military vehicles. In this research, we aimed to evaluate the effects of training on CID performance in order to reduce fratricide errors.

Method. Individuals were trained on 12 combat vehicles in a simulation, which were presented via either a non-stereoscopic or active stereoscopic display using NVIDIA's GeForce shutter glass technology. Self-report was used to assess video game experience, leading to four between-subjects groups: high video game experience with stereoscopy, low video game experience with stereoscopy, high video game experience without stereoscopy, and low video game experience without stereoscopy. We then tested participants on their memory of each vehicle's alliance and name across multiple measures, including photographs and videos.

Results. There was a main effect for both video game experience and stereoscopy across many of the dependent measures. Further, we found interactions between video game experience and stereoscopic training, such that those individuals with high video game experience in the non-stereoscopic group had the highest performance outcomes in the sample on multiple dependent measures.

Conclusion This study suggests that individual differences in video game experience may be predictive of enhanced performance in CID tasks.

Application. Selection based on video game experience in CID tasks may be a useful strategy for future military training. Future research should investigate the generalizability of these effects, such as identification through unmanned vehicle sensors.

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Citation
Keebler, Joseph R.; Jentsch, Florian; Schuster, David. 2014. The effects of video game experience and active stereoscopy on performance in combat identification tasks. Human Factors: The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, vol. 56:no. 8:pp 1482-1496
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SAGE Publications
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0018-7208
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