The biological interaction of astrocytes and collagen/soy protein based biocompatible matrices for assistance in neural recuperation

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Authors
Vishwa Sai, Haneesha
Issue Date
2022-05
Type
Thesis
Language
en_US
Keywords
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Journal Issue
Alternative Title
Abstract

Astrocytes play significant roles in various cell processes of the central nervous system (CNS), that actively participate in neuronal regulation for functional regeneration and repair of brain or spinal cord injuries. Astrocytes are specialized to assist in the reduction of damaged tissue surrounding the injury site and simultaneously stitch back the disrupted blood brain barrier in support of neural tissue and maintenance of brain homeostasis. Glial scar is the result of astrogliosis where astrocytes migrate to the target site and extensively proliferate to protect cells from further damage. Astrocyte motility and migration can be modulated through molecular interaction with various biocompatible environments like collagen (animal protein) and soy protein isolates (plant protein, SPI). Collagen type I is a popularly used biocompatible matrix in biological and medical settings. It portrays well-designed structure and closely mimics the function of extracellular matrix protein in controlling cell survival, migration, and other properties. Soy protein isolates, in combination with collagen, have shown good scaffolding properties with no cytotoxic or degradation effects. SPI/collagen combinations serve as a promising biocompatible matrix for tissue regeneration processes. In this study, we focus on fabrication of hybrid collagen-SPI biocompatible matrices and analyze the properties of these as hydrogels and substrates to provide a potential bioenvironment for astrocyte development, function, survival, and migration. These studies further expand on the significant potential these matrices possess, providing diverse properties influencing the survival and migration of astrocytes that assist neural recuperation while serving as a filling material in neural conduits designed in previous studies.

Description
Thesis (M.S.)-- Wichita State University, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Dept. of Biological Sciences
Citation
Publisher
Wichita State University
License
© Copyright 2022 by HaneeshaVishwa Sai All Rights Reserved
Journal
Volume
Issue
PubMed ID
DOI
ISSN
EISSN