Mentoring mid-career: reflections on fostering a culture of mentorship for experienced librarians

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Authors
Williams, Ginger H.
Issue Date
2019-03
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Article
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en_US
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Abstract

Academic librarians need mentoring opportunities. If personal experience doesn't convince you, perhaps the number of academic librarians talking about mentoring – at conferences, online, at your place of work, in academic journals – will. The focus of most academic libraries' mentoring programs is junior librarians (Lorenzetti & Powelson, 2015, p. 194), which can leave more experienced librarians feeling lost or abandoned. Librarians of all specialties often turn to one another as part of their self-directed learning processes when they take on new responsibilities (Bilodeau & Carson, 2014). While this is expected of new librarians, it can start to feel uncomfortable as a librarian progresses to mid-career. At this stage, mid-career librarians are assumed to have already established their own support systems, but they may not have found all the varieties of support that they need in order to continue to grow. Those who can and do should be commended, but those who cannot need to be supported.

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Citation
Williams, Ginger H. 2019. Mentoring mid-career: reflections on fostering a culture of mentorship for experienced librarians. Journal of Academic Librarianship, vol. 45:no. 2:pp 171-173
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Elsevier
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0099-1333
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