Redefining sickle cell anemia in African American communities.

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Authors
Meyappan, Janaki
Advisors
Issue Date
2001
Type
Article
Keywords
Sickle cell disease , Genetic disorders , African Americans
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Journal Issue
Citation
Meyappan, Janaki (2001). Redefining sickle cell anemia in African American communities.-- Lambda Alpha Journal, v-31, p.6-13.
Abstract

Sickle cell disease (SCD) affects lout of 600 African American individuals at birth. More than 50,000 African Americans have it today. It is a genetic disorder that affects an individual's hemoglobin and has deleterious effects on an individual's life (Steinberg 1999). Many studies have been done to see the medical effects of sickle cell anemia yet it is interesting to unpack the disease and its relevance within a particular population. The primary objective of this analysis is the study of African-American mothers of children with sickle cell disease and the ways in which they react to the diagnosis and manage healthcare of their children. The mothers in the study are the primary caregivers for their children and they are active participants, creators, and definers of the social world in which they live. The meanings they construct and assign to the sickle cell disease experience develop from their own values, resources and life experience and thus differ from the meanings medical experts assign to the disease.

Table of Contents
Description
Publisher
Wichita State University. Department of Anthropology
Journal
Book Title
Series
LAJ
v.31
PubMed ID
DOI
ISSN
0047-3928
EISSN