Comparison between continuous positive airway pressure vs.uvulopalatopharyngoplasty in treatment of obstructive sleep apnea in adult males

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Issue Date
2007-04-27
Authors
Davis, Jill A.
Griffin, Audrey
Advisor
Citation

Davis, Jill A. and Audrey Griffin.(2007). Comparison between continuous positive airway pressure vs.uvulopalatopharyngoplasty in treatment of obstructive sleep apnea in adult males. In Proceedings : 3rd Annual Symposium : Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects. Wichita, KS : Wichita State University, p.103-104

Abstract

Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a condition characterized by repeated cessation of breathing throughout sleep. This lack of breathing can occur anywhere from 5-50 times in one hour and can last for ten seconds or longer. This is usually caused by an obstruction in the airway, nose or throat. This condition affects about 4% of the adult male population. People at risk include those that are male, older than thirty years, have family history of condition, certain ethnicities such as Hispanics and African Americans, loss or weak muscle tone in throat or tongue, medical conditions that cause abnormalities of head or face and those going through menopause. Treatments or therapy for OSA are widely available and include Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) and uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP). Methodology: An evidencebased systemic literature review was completed acquiring studies regarding CPAP and UPPP in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea in adult males. Medline and Eco were searched for articles that met the defined inclusion criteria. Inclusion criteria were as follow: treatment of OSA with either CPAP or UPPP, dated 1981-2006, include adult males in the study, and have data pertaining to apnea index (AI), apnea/hypopnea index (AHI). Patients were considered successful if their AHI, AI, or RDI (apnea and hypopneas) was decreased by ≥50% or if the end result was <20 AHI, AI, or RDI episodes per hour of sleep. Results: Forty-seven articles matched the criteria. These articles proved success of CPAP and mixed success/failure for UPPP. Conclusion: The most effective and successful treatment for obstructive sleep apnea in adult males is CPAP with a grade B recommendation. UPPP is recommended as second line therapy.

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Description
Paper presented to the 3rd Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects (GRASP) held at the Hughes Metropolitan Complex, Wichita State University, April 27, 2007.
Research completed at the Dept. of Physician Assistant, College of Health Professions
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