The effects of a standing intervention on low back Pain, flexibility, gluteal strength, and abdominal strength in DPT students

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Authors
Ekart, Marcas
Ramirez, Carmen
Simmons, Kassidy
Veenis, Adam
Issue Date
2017-04-28
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Abstract
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en_US
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Abstract

Introduction: This study is designed to determine if a relationship exists between increased standing during class lecture time and gluteus medius strength, abdominal strength, hip flexor flexibility, hamstring flexibility, gastrocnemius flexibility, back pain, or physical activity level in healthy students aged 18-35 years. Methods: Twenty participants were recruited from the WSU Doctor of Physical Therapy program. Ten subjects used standing desks for 75% of class lecture time for 12 weeks. They were matched to 10 control subjects who sat throughout class lectures. Dynamometry, goniometry, inclinometry, and questionnaires were used for objective measurements assessed at weeks 0, 6, and 12. Results/Conclusion: Standing during 75% of class lecture time induced statistically significant increases in hip abductor strength, decreases in back pain, and a clinically significant increase in hamstring flexibility over 12 weeks compared to controls. No detrimental changes were found in the seven studied variables with a 3:1 standing-to-sitting ratio.

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Presented to the 13th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects (GRASP) held at the Rhatigan Student Center, Wichita State University, April 28, 2017.
Research completed in the Department of Physical Therapy, College of Health Professions
Citation
Ekart, Marcas, Ramirez, Carmen, Simmons, Kassidy and Veenis, Adam. 2017. The effects of a standing intervention on low back Pain, flexibility, gluteal strength, and abdominal strength in DPT students--In Proceedings: 13th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects. Wichita, KS: Wichita State University, p.73
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Wichita State University
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