Effect of simulated space conditions on functional connectivity

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Authors
Aarotale, Parshuram N.
Desai, Jaydip
Issue Date
2022-04-01
Type
Article
Language
en_US
Keywords
Electroencephalogram (EEG) , Functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) , International space Station (ISS) etc.
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Abstract

Long duration spaceflight missions can affect the cognitive and behavioral activities of astronauts due to changes in gravity. The microgravity significantly impacts the central nervous system physiology which causes the degradation in the performance and lead to potential risk in the space exploration. The aim of this study was to evaluate functional connectivity at simulated space conditions using an unloading harness system to mimic the body-weight distribution related to Earth, Mars, and International Space Station. A unity model with six directional arrows to imagine six different motor imagery tasks associated with arms and legs were designed for the Oculus Rift S virtual reality headset for testing. An Electroencephalogram (EEG) and functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) signals were recorded from 10 participants in the distributed weight conditions related to Earth, Mars, and International Space station using the g.Nautilus fNIRS system at sampling rate of 500 Hz. The magnitude squared coherence were estimated from left vs right hemisphere of the brain that represents functional connectivity. The EEG coherence was the higher which shows the strong functional connectivity and fNIRS coherence was lower shows weak functional connectivity between left vs right hemisphere of the brain, during all the tasks and trials irrespective of the simulated space conditions. Further analysis of functional connectivity needed between the intra-regions of the brain.

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Citation
Aarotale, P. N., & Desai, J. (2022). Effect of simulated space conditions on functional connectivity. Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation, 5(2).
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International Academic Express
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ISSN
0067-8856
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