Assistance to immune system by genetically engineered bacteria: Molecular communication

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Issue Date
2016-04-29
Authors
Chandana, Vermula
Advisor
Kwon, Hyuck M.
Citation

Chandana, Vemula. 2016. Assistance to immune system by genetically engineered bacteria: Molecular communication. --In Proceedings: 12th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects. Wichita, KS: Wichita State University, p. 112

Abstract

Molecular communication (MC) is a communication between bio transmitters (that emit molecules carrying information) and bio receivers. The use of such a communication method also involving genetically engineered bacteria and immune cells results in the development of a curative methodology dealt in the paper. A Bacterium is engineered by bacteria plasmid splicing– a new gene insertion technique. Here, plasmid is separated from the bacterium and immune cell gene is inserted into it. This engineered plasmid is placed back into the bacterium and it is kept in the culture to multiply. These genetically engineered bacteria upon being injected into the blood stream starts functioning as immune cells developed artificially. Thereby, assist the immune cells of the organism. In cases where the immune system activity is lost, altered or weakened these genetically engineered bacteria developed will assist the immune cells of the organism and also cure the effected immune cells.

Table of Content
Description
Presented to the 12th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects (GRASP) held at the Heskett Center, Wichita State University, April 29, 2016.
Research completed at Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering
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