The role of personal epistemology in selection of stuttering treatment

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Authors
Moyer, Loni
Issue Date
2012-12
Type
Thesis
Language
en_US
Keywords
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Journal Issue
Alternative Title
Abstract

Clinicians’ personal epistemology about stuttering and knowledge may directly affect their clinical decision-making process. The purpose of the current study was to obtain a better understanding of the relationship between clinicians’ epistemological beliefs and their selection of stuttering treatment – fluency shaping or stuttering modification. This study (a) examines the clinicians’ beliefs about the structure and complexity of knowledge and (b) investigates whether clinicians adapt a particular form of epistemological beliefs specific to their treatment preference with persons who stutter (PWS). Participants were 174 certified speech-language pathologists who responded to questionnaires that included a stuttering-specific epistemological beliefs scale and predominant ways of knowing. Results indicate that persons who have higher levels of separate knowing have a preference for the fluency shaping approach with PWS. People who believe knowledge is more complex and is always changing have a preference for the stuttering modification approach. The findings of the current study suggest that clinicians’ personal epistemology (rather than the tenets of evidence-based practice) may be playing a significant role in some clinical decisions.

Description
Thesis (M.A.)--Wichita State University, College of Health Professions, Dept. of Communication Sciences and Disorders
Citation
Publisher
Wichita State University
License
Copyright Loni Moyer, 2012. All rights reserved
Journal
Volume
Issue
PubMed ID
DOI
ISSN
EISSN