Texting while driving using google glass: Promising but not distraction-free

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Authors
Choi, William
McCarley, Jason S.
Wang, Chun
Issue Date
2015-04-24
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en_US
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Abstract

Texting while driving is risky, yet common. Smartphones are not the only devices though which are capable of texting. Google Glass is an upcoming head-mounted display (HMD) that allows users to text via a voice-based interface. This study investigated the effects of texting with Google Glass on driving performance compared to texting with a smartphone. Participants completed a standard car-following task in a driving simulator. There were three possible texting methods: manual texting with a smartphone, voice-based texting with a smartphone, and voice-based texting with Google Glass. All texting methods impaired driving performance compared to the drive-only condition. Texting with Google Glass, however, was less disruptive to driving performance compared to texting with the smartphone for both manual and voice-based texting. The results suggest that the Google Glass configuration may be beneficial to driving performance. However, Google Glass may still be harmful to driving safety.

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Presented to the 11th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects (GRASP) held at the Heskett Center, Wichita State University, April 24, 2015.
Research completed at Department of Psychology, Fairmount College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Citation
Choi, William. Texting While Driving Using Google Glass: Promising But Not Distraction-Free. --In Proceedings: 11th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects. Wichita, KS: Wichita State University, p. 36
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Wichita State University. Graduate School
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