Effects of home exercise balance program on Biodex® testing and hoverboard time trials

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Issue Date
2019-04-26
Embargo End Date
Authors
Taylor, Brooks
Hoang, Kim
Howell, Zach
Symens, Diana
Advisor
Garcia, Lisa A.
Citation

Taylor, Brooks, Hoang, Kim, Howell, Zach, Symens, Diana. 2019. Effects of home exercise balance program on Biodex® testing and hoverboard time trials -- In Proceedings: 15th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects. Wichita, KS: Wichita State University

Abstract

The purpose of this project was to identify if an ankle strategy exercise program will decrease the risk of injury when riding on a hoverboard. Hoverboards are a cause of serious injuries throughout the U.S. but continue to be purchased for recreational use and public transportation. To see if a simple exercise program could decrease falls and injuries, a sample of convenience of 30 participants ranging from 18-30 years old volunteered from the College of Health Professions at Wichita State University. They received a baseline Biodex® reading along with a baseline for time and falls through an obstacle course on a hoverboard. 15 participants performed the following exercises: ankle sway, single leg balance, heel raises progressing to: larger ankle sway movements, single leg balance on labile surfaces and all came back six weeks later to be re-measured. When these results were analyzed there were no statistically significant results. Despite the results not being statistically significant, the experimental group did improve to a higher degree in terms of reducing the number of falls and course time. With this research and other projects like it, if improved, hoverboard injuries may be prevented.

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Description
Presented to the 15th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects (GRASP) held at the Rhatigan Student Center, Wichita State University, April 26, 2019.
Research completed in the Department of Physical Therapy, College of Health Professions
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