The efficacy of orlistat vs. sibutramine in the treatment of obesity: asystematic literature review

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Issue Date
2007-04-27
Embargo End Date
Authors
Kloer, Lindsay
Nyberg, Sue M.
Advisor
Citation

Kloer, Lindsay & Nyberg, Sue M. (2007). The efficacy of orlistat vs. sibutramine in the treatment of obesity: asystematic literature review. In Proceedings : 3rd Annual Symposium : Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects. Wichita, KS : Wichita State University, p.143-144

Abstract

Since obesity is the second leading cause of preventable death in the United States, effective treatments are crucial in order to stop the progression of this epidemic. Currently, orlistat (Xenical) and sibutramine (Meridia, Reductil) are the only FDA approved obesity drugs for long-term weight loss in adults. The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of these two drugs in initial weight loss as well as long-term maintenance of that weight lost. An evidence-based systematic literature review was conducted using the following databases: Medline, ECO, and Cochrane. Articles chosen for inclusion were from 1990 to present, level 1 or 2 evidence and from peer-reviewed journals. Participants were over 18 years old with a BMI greater than 27 kg/m2. There were 18 level 1 randomized controlled trials demonstrating the effectiveness of both medications to produce weight loss. Therefore, a Grade A recommendation can be made regarding the use of either orlistat or sibutramine in a primary care setting for 5-10% weight loss. Also, there were 10 level 1 randomized controlled trials demonstrating the management of the weight loss for up to 2 years, so a Grade A recommendation can be made regarding the use of either orlistat or sibutramine in the long-term management of weight loss. Both medications are effective for an obese patient who has failed on diet and exercise alone, so selection of which medication to prescribe is primarily determined on which medication the patient is most able to tolerate.

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Description
Paper presented to the 3rd Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects (GRASP) held at the Hughes Metropolitan Complex, Wichita State University, April 27, 2007.
Research completed at the Department of Physician Assistant, College of Health Professions.
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