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dc.contributor.authorCha, H.L.
dc.contributor.authorRaile, T.M.
dc.contributor.authorHale, LaDonna S.
dc.date.accessioned2007-09-06T17:56:54Z
dc.date.available2007-09-06T17:56:54Z
dc.date.issued2007-04-27
dc.identifier.citationCha H.L, Raile T.M. & L.S. Hale. (2007). Effectiveness of a sepsis response team in the treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock: A 20 patient feasibility study. In Proceedings : 3rd Annual Symposium : Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects. Wichita, KS : Wichita State University, p.117-118en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/864
dc.descriptionPaper presented to the 3rd Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects (GRASP) held at the Hughes Metropolitan Complex, Wichita State University, April 27, 2007.Research completed at Department of Physician Assistant, College of Health Professions, Wichita state university.en
dc.descriptionResearch completed at Department of Physician Assistant, College of Health Professions.en
dc.description.abstractThe Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) advocates use of a national data collection tool to measure compliance with treatment guidelines for severe sepsis. Some facilities utilize a Sepsis Response Team (SRT) to manage sepsis; however, their effectiveness has not been published. Purpose: Provide information to aid in the design of an appropriate study methodology, develop a multidisciplinary research team, create a paper data collection tool, utilize the SCCM data collection tool, and develop resource expectations needed to perform larger-scale studies. Setting: 760-bed tertiary care teaching hospital. Methods: This feasibility study describes the process to form a multidisciplinary research team, select patients, create a paper data collection form, utilize the SCCM tool, and retrospectively collect data from 20 patient charts, 10 treated by a SRT and 10 treated by individual prescribers. Results: Mean hours required for chart abstraction dropped significantly as the team gained experience with the abstraction process. Several SCCM data points were subjective, requiring a team consensus of definitions to maintain consistency. A difference in mean age between groups was identified. Other confounding variables that may be encountered in a larger-scale study were identified and are discussed. Conclusion: Large-scale studies evaluating efficacy of a SRT using the SCCM tool, will likely require significant resources and a multi-disciplinary team of researchers. A case-matched study design may be needed to mitigate population differences.en
dc.format.extent191489 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherWichita State University. Graduate School.en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGRASPen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesv.3en
dc.titleEffectiveness of a sepsis response team in the treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock: A 20 patient feasibility studyen
dc.typeConference paperen


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