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dc.contributor.authorHouseman, Gregory R.
dc.contributor.authorFoster, Bryan L.
dc.contributor.authorBrassil, Chad E.
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-12T20:02:40Z
dc.date.available2014-03-12T20:02:40Z
dc.date.issued2014-02
dc.identifier.citationHouseman, Gregory R.; Foster, Bryan L.; Brassil, Chad E. 2014. Propagule pressure-invasibility relationships: testing the influence of soil fertility and disturbance with Lespedeza cuneata. Oecologia, vol. 174:no. 2:ppg. 511-520en_US
dc.identifier.issn0029-8549
dc.identifier.otherWOS:000330734100018
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00442-013-2781-x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/7120
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough invasion risk is expected to increase with propagule pressure (PP), it is unclear whether PP-invasibility relationships follow an asymptotic or some other non-linear form and whether such relationships vary with underlying environmental conditions. Using manipulations of PP, soil fertility and disturbance, we tested how each influence PP-invasibility relationships for Lespedeza cuneata in a Kansas grassland and use recruitment curve models to determine how safe sites may contribute to plant invasions. After three growing seasons, we found that the PP-invasibility relationships best fit an asymptotic model of invasion reflecting a combination of density-independent and density-dependent processes and that seeds were aggregated within the plant community despite efforts to uniformly sow seeds. Consistent with some models, community invasibility decreased with enhanced soil fertility or reduced levels of disturbance in response to changes in the fraction of safe sites. Our results illustrate that disturbance and soil fertility can be a useful organizing principle for predicting community invasibility, asymptotic models are a reasonable starting point for modeling invasion, and new modeling techniques-coupled with classic experimental approaches-can enhance our understanding of the invasion process.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Research Initiative, Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, US Department of Agriculture award 2006-35320-17239 to G. R. H. and NSF DEB 0953766 to C. E. B.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Berlin Heidelbergen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesOecologia;v.174:no.2
dc.subjectInvasibilityen_US
dc.subjectBiotic resistanceen_US
dc.subjectSeed additionen_US
dc.subjectSaturating functionen_US
dc.subjectAsymptotic relationshipen_US
dc.titlePropagule pressure-invasibility relationships: testing the influence of soil fertility and disturbance with Lespedeza cuneataen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2013, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg


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