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dc.contributor.authorCathey, Angela J.
dc.contributor.authorWetterneck, Chad T.
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-07T21:36:16Z
dc.date.available2014-02-07T21:36:16Z
dc.date.issued2013-10
dc.identifier.citationCathey, Angela J.; Wetterneck, Chad T. 2013. Stigma and disclosure of intrusive thoughts about sexual themes. Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders, vol. 2:no. 4:ppg. 439–443en_US
dc.identifier.issn2211-3649
dc.identifier.otherWOS:000328238100013
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jocrd.2013.09.001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/7055
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractObsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is often described as one of the most chronic and severe anxiety disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 2000). Those with OCD typically experience both obsessions and compulsions most often revolving around one of the several themes in content. The most commonly reported themes for obsessions include: contamination, symmetry and doubting, and harming, religious, or sexual obsessions. Little is known about perceived stigma associated with various symptom presentations although sexual obsessions have been hypothesized to be less frequently disclosed due to embarrassment (Simonds & Thorpe, 2003), which could lead to delay or avoidance of treatment. Adult participants (n=157) rated their perceptions of a hypothetical (1) friend or (2) significant other who had disclosed either (1) a sexually intrusive thought or (2) a contamination related intrusive thought to them. Results indicated that disclosure of an intrusive thought about a sexual theme is associated with more social rejection than disclosure of a contamination related intrusive thought. Additionally, disclosure of an intrusive thought by a friend is likely to meet with more disapproval than disclosure by a significant other. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders;v.2:no.4
dc.subjectObsessive-compulsive disorderen_US
dc.subjectIntrusive thoughtsen_US
dc.subjectThought appraisalen_US
dc.subjectSexual obsessionsen_US
dc.subjectMental health stigmaen_US
dc.titleStigma and disclosure of intrusive thoughts about sexual themesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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