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dc.contributor.authorShaffer, Victoria A.
dc.contributor.authorHulsey, Lukas
dc.contributor.authorZikmund-Fisher, Brian J.
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-14T16:13:13Z
dc.date.available2014-01-14T16:13:13Z
dc.date.issued2013-11
dc.identifier.citationShaffer, Victoria; Hulsey, Lukas; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J. 2013. The effects of process-focused versus experience-focused narratives in a breast cancer treatment decision task. Patient Education and Counseling, vol. 93:no. 2, November 2013:pp. 255–264en_US
dc.identifier.issn0738-3991
dc.identifier.otherWOS:000326905100013
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2013.07.013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/6992
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine the effect of patient narratives that discuss decision processes versus patient experiences on decisions about treatments for early stage breast cancer. Methods: We recruited 300 women with no previous history of breast cancer to imagine that they had been diagnosed with early stage breast cancer and to choose between mastectomy and lumpectomy with radiation. Before learning about their treatment options, participants were randomly assigned to one of four conditions with videotaped stories from fictitious cancer survivors, using a 2 (content: experience versus process) x 2 (emotional valence: positive only vs. positive and negative) factorial design, or a control condition with no stories. We measured information search, treatment intentions, and decision satisfaction. Results: Participants viewing process narratives spent more time searching for information. Participants viewing experience narratives reported a greater ability to imagine what it was like to experience the treatments; they also evaluated their decision more positively on several dimensions. Conclusions: Process narratives appeared to guide information search, and experience narratives improved evaluations of the decision process. Practice implications: There is no evidence that process and experience narratives 'bias' decisions in the same manner as outcome narratives. Further, their potential to focus patient attention on key information and increase patient confidence in decision making appears significant.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipInformed Medical Decisions Foundation (Grant 0172-1). Dr. Zikmund-Fisher was supported by a Mentored Research Scholar Grant from the American Cancer Society (MRSG-06-130-01-CPPB).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltden_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPatient Education and Counseling;v.93:no.2
dc.subjectNarrativesen_US
dc.subjectBreast canceren_US
dc.subjectDecision makingen_US
dc.subjectDecision supporten_US
dc.subjectPatient decision aidsen_US
dc.titleThe effects of process-focused versus experience-focused narratives in a breast cancer treatment decision tasken_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


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