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dc.contributor.advisorBakken, Linda
dc.contributor.authorJaradat, Maram Salah
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-11T14:31:33Z
dc.date.available2013-04-11T14:31:33Z
dc.date.copyright2012
dc.date.issued2012-12
dc.identifier.otherd12034
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/5585
dc.descriptionThesis (Ed.D)--Wichita State University, College of Education, Dept. of Counseling, Educational Leadership, Educational and School Psychologyen_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to research the problem presented in Middle East countries: Students' boredom and lack of motivation to interact in their classrooms in higher education. The focus of the study was to find ways in which technology can be used as a means to motivate students to interact with each other and with the learning activities in classrooms. Keller's motivational theory (2008) and its components (Attention, Relevance, Satisfaction, Confidence) provided the theory to address the relationship between technology and student interest in the classroom. The study was conducted in Nizwa College of Technology, Nizwa, Oman. The participants were 600 students and 30 instructors. Four surveys were used in this study; three of them were given to the students and one was given to the instructors. The findings supported Keller's motivational theory and its components regarding using technology to motivate students to interact with their instructors, with the learning activities, and with each other. There was a significant correlation between using technology in classrooms and gaining students' attention. There was a significant correlation between using technology and the relevance of the material presented in classrooms and students' real life. There was a significant correlation between using technology and students' confidence in participating in classrooms using technology. There was a significant correlation between using technology and students' satisfaction with the material presented in classrooms. To address students' motivation in classrooms, Keller (2001, 2008)posited that these four categories (Attention, Relevance, Confidence, and Satisfaction [ARCS]) operated together to motivate students to interact in the classroom. ARCS was significantly correlated with students' learning experiences, students' learning strategies, and computer use in course.en_US
dc.format.extentix, 116en
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWichita State Universityen_US
dc.rightsCopyright Maram Salah Jaradat, 2012. All rights reserveden
dc.subject.lcshElectronic dissertationsen
dc.titleThe relationship of instructional technology with students’ motivation and interaction in higher educationen_US
dc.typeDissertation


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  • Dissertations [500]
    This collection includes Ph.D. dissertations completed at the Wichita State University Graduate School (Fall 2005 --)
  • COE Theses and Dissertations [180]
    Master's theses and Ed.D. dissertations of College of Education

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