Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorOvercash, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-23T17:16:00Z
dc.date.available2012-05-23T17:16:00Z
dc.date.issued2012-04-04
dc.identifier.citationOvercash M. 2012. "A comparison of reusable and disposable perioperative textiles: Sustainability state-of-the-art 2012". Anesthesia and Analgesia. 114 (5): 1055-1066.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-2999
dc.identifier.otherWOS:000303231400021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/5103
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1213/ANE.0b013e31824d9cc3
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link below to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractContemporary comparisons of reusable and single-use perioperative textiles (surgical gowns and drapes) reflect major changes in the technologies to produce and reuse these products. Reusable and disposable gowns and drapes meet new standards for medical workers and patient protection, use synthetic lightweight fabrics, and are competitively priced. In multiple science-based life cycle environmental studies, reusable surgical gowns and drapes demonstrate substantial sustainability benefits over the same disposable product in natural resource energy (200%-300%), water (250%-330%), carbon footprint (200%-300%), volatile organics, solid wastes (750%), and instrument recovery. Because all other factors (cost, protection, and comfort) are reasonably similar, the environmental benefits of reusable surgical gowns and drapes to health care sustainability programs are important for this industry. Thus, it is no longer valid to indicate that reusables are better in some environmental i! mpacts and disposables are better in other environmental impacts. It is also important to recognize that large-scale studies of comfort, protection, or economics have not been actively pursued in the last 5 to 10 years, and thus the factors to improve both reusables and disposable systems are difficult to assess. In addition, the comparison related to jobs is not well studied, but may further support reusables. In summary, currently available perioperative textiles are similar in comfort, safety, and cost, but reusable textiles offer substantial opportunities for nurses, physicians, and hospitals to reduce environmental footprints when selected over disposable alternatives. Evidenced-based comparison of environmental factors supports the conclusion that reusable gowns and drapes offer important sustainability improvements. The benefit of reusable systems may be similar for other reusables in anesthesia, such as laryngeal mask airways or suction canisters, but life cycle stu! dies are needed to substantiate these benefits. (Anesth Analg ! 2012;114 :1055-66)en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherLIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINSen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAnesthesia and Analgesia;2012, V.114, No.5
dc.subject.classificationANESTHESIOLOGY
dc.titleA comparison of reusable and disposable perioperative textiles: Sustainability state-of-the-art 2012en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPeer reviewed
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2012 International Anesthesia Research Society


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record