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dc.contributorWichita State University. Department of Managementen_US
dc.contributor.authorFarmer, Steven M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Dyne, Linnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-29T21:01:20Z
dc.date.available2012-03-29T21:01:20Z
dc.date.issued2010-05en_US
dc.identifier20476829en_US
dc.identifier0222526en_US
dc.identifier2010-09357-006en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Journal of applied psychology. 2010 May; 95(3): 503-16.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1939-1854en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-9010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0019149en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/5004
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link below to access the article (may not be free). You may also access it at: http://search.proquest.com/docview/614520322?accountid=15042.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis article presents a model integrating research on idealized and situated selves. Our key premise is that identity-relevant behaviors are most likely to occur in the workplace when identities are psychologically central and activating forces make those identities salient. Analysis of matched data from 278 employees, supervisors, and organizational records generally supported our model. Helping identity and industrious work identity were positively associated with related role behaviors only when time-based occupancy in the role of organization member was high. Industrious work identity was positively associated with role behaviors only when reflected appraisals from coworkers were consistent with that identity. In contrast, reflected appraisal of helping identity had an independent relationship with identity-relevant role behaviors. Results demonstrate the importance of theory linking the idealized self and the situated self to understanding identity relations with work performances.en_US
dc.format.extent503-16en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesThe Journal of Applied Psychologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJ Appl Psycholen_US
dc.sourceNLMen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshEmployee Performance Appraisalen_US
dc.subject.meshEmploymenten_US
dc.subject.meshFoster Home Careen_US
dc.subject.meshHelping Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshJob Satisfactionen_US
dc.subject.meshMental Disorders/epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshSelf Concepten_US
dc.subject.meshVulnerable Populationsen_US
dc.subject.meshMental Disorders/psychologyen_US
dc.titleThe idealized self and the situated self as predictors of employee work behaviorsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.coverage.spacialUnited Statesen_US
dc.description.versionpeer revieweden_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2010 American Psychological Associationen_US


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