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dc.contributorWichita State University. School of Community Affairsen_US
dc.contributor.authorPitetti, Kenneth H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Kathryn D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-13T16:44:52Z
dc.date.available2012-03-13T16:44:52Z
dc.date.issued1991-05en_US
dc.identifier2072837en_US
dc.identifier8005433en_US
dc.identifier.citationMedicine and science in sports and exercise. 1991 May; 23(5): 586-93.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0195-9131en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/4815
dc.descriptionThe full text of this article is not available in SOAR. Check the journal record http://libcat.wichita.edu/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=368173 for the paper version of the article in the library.en_US
dc.description.abstractWhen comparing the aging process of mentally retarded (MR) persons with the nondisabled population, researchers have established an earlier lower limit for the onset of old age for MR persons and a higher mortality rate. The reason for early senescence has not been successfully resolved, but the finding that cardiovascular disorders are the most prevalent form of disease among elderly MR persons suggests a relationship between lifestyles and higher mortality rate. Indeed, studies that evaluated the cardiovascular fitness (CVF) of MR individuals demonstrated substandard levels of fitness. The results of these studies, however, are not conclusive due to variation in test methodologies, motivational factors, and issues of test validity and reliability. Training studies which have purported to determine trainability of this population have also shown confusing results, perhaps attributed to the same protocol inconsistencies. Therefore, the purposes of this article are 1) to review previous methods of evaluating CVF of MR adults and determine whether testing methodologies invalidate the results of these studies, 2) to review training studies involving adult MR individuals and determine whether this population is capable of improving their CVF, and 3) to identify areas where further research is needed to fully describe the functional cardiovascular characteristics of MR adults.en_US
dc.format.extent586-93en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkinsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMedicine and Science In Sports and Exerciseen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMed Sci Sports Exercen_US
dc.sourceNLMen_US
dc.subjectReviewen_US
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases/etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIntellectual Disability/complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshMotivationen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysical Education and Trainingen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysical Fitnessen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.titleMentally retarded individuals--a population at risk?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.coverage.spacialUnited Statesen_US
dc.description.versionpeer revieweden_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 1991 The American College of Sports Medicineen_US


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