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dc.contributorWichita State University. Department of Physical Therapyen_US
dc.contributor.authorManske, Robert C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTajchman, Casey S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStranghoner, Todd A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEllenbecker, Todd S.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-12T19:12:42Z
dc.date.available2012-03-12T19:12:42Z
dc.date.issued2004-08en_US
dc.identifier15320671en_US
dc.identifier9415084en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Association. 2004 Aug; 18(3): 447-50.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1064-8011en_US
dc.identifier.otherEBSCOID 14215835
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/4792
dc.descriptionThe full text of this article is not available in SOAR. Access this article via EBSCO Host # 14215835en_US
dc.description.abstractRotator cuff function is critical to the overhead athlete. Rotator cuff power is felt to be important in the overhead athlete during the throwing motion. Little research exists regarding torque acceleration energy (TAE) in overhead athletes. Twenty-five males were divided into 2 groups consisting of overhead athletes (pitchers) (n = 12) and nonoverhead athletes (controls) (n = 13). All participants were given a concentric velocity spectrum isokinetic test at speeds of 60 degrees (1.05 r), 180 degrees (3.16 r), and 300 degrees.s(-1) (5.26 r) to both the dominant and nondominant shoulder internal and external rotators. Significant differences were found for all internal rotator TAE scores (p = 0.000-0.016), at each of the 3 velocities, when comparing dominant to nondominant arms of both overhead athletes and nonoverhead athletes. Only 60 degrees.s(-1) (1.05 r) was found to be different during external rotation TAE testing of the overhead athletes (p = 0.027) but was not found in the control subjects. Post hoc analysis revealed no differences between dominant or nondominant TAE scores when comparisons were made between overhead athletes and controls. Results may reveal that power of the rotator cuff muscles may not be a critical component of the overhead throwing motion.en_US
dc.format.extent447-50en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkinsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research / National Strength & Conditioning Associationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJ Strength Cond Resen_US
dc.sourceNLMen_US
dc.subjectClinical Trialen_US
dc.subjectComparative Studyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBaseball/physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshExercise/physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFunctional Laterality/physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshKineticsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshReference Valuesen_US
dc.subject.meshRotator Cuff/physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTorqueen_US
dc.titleDifference in isokinetic torque acceleration energy of the rotator cuff: competitive male pitchers versus male nonathletesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.coverage.spacialUnited Statesen_US
dc.description.versionpeer revieweden_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2004 National Strength and Conditioning Associationen_US


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