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dc.contributorWichita State University. Department of Physical Therapyen_US
dc.contributor.authorScudds, Rhonda J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcD. Robertson, Jamesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-12T19:12:38Z
dc.date.available2012-03-12T19:12:38Z
dc.date.issued1998-04en_US
dc.identifier9583758en_US
dc.identifier7508686en_US
dc.identifier.citationRhonda J Scudds, James McD. Robertson, Empirical evidence of the association between the presence of musculoskeletal pain and physical disability in community-dwelling senior citizens, Pain, Volume 75, Issues 2–3, January 1998, Pages 229-235. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0304-3959(97)00224-8.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0304-3959en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/4787
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0304-3959(97)00224-8
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link to access this article (may not be free)en_US
dc.description.abstractThe proportion of people 65 years of age and older who report musculoskeletal pain and physical disability is high. The main objective of this study was to determine whether physical disability was associated with the presence of musculoskeletal pain in a sample of senior citizens. Self-administered questionnaires were sent to a sample of 1306 community-dwelling senior citizens in London, Ontario, Canada between August and October 1995. The questionnaire included questions about pain, difficulty performing activities, depressive symptoms, chronic conditions, and demographic information. A total of 887 seniors completed the questionnaire (70.7% response rate, aged 65-94, 41.2% men, 58.8% women). Logistic regression analysis, without controlling for potential confounding variables, revealed that those who reported having musculoskeletal pain were seven times more likely to have some difficulty performing three or more activities listed in the questionnaire (OR = 6.91 95% CI 4.92-9.69). When significant confounding variables were controlled in the analysis, seniors who reported musculoskeletal pain were still three times more likely to have some difficulty with three or more activities (OR = 2.93, 95% CI 1.96-4.38). Although no causal relationship can be inferred, thorough pain assessment and pain management may be important in the maintenance of independent living for adults 65 years of age or older.en_US
dc.format.extent229-35en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPainen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPainen_US
dc.sourceNLMen_US
dc.subjectResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten_US
dc.subject.meshActivities of Daily Livingen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_US
dc.subject.meshAging/physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDisabled Personsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGeriatric Assessmenten_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMusculoskeletal Diseases/physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshOntarioen_US
dc.subject.meshPain/physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshResidence Characteristicsen_US
dc.titleEmpirical evidence of the association between the presence of musculoskeletal pain and physical disability in community-dwelling senior citizensen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.coverage.spacialNetherlandsen_US
dc.description.versionpeer revieweden_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © Elsevieren_US


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