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dc.contributorWichita State University. Department of Public Health Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.authorSwan, James H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHunter, H. R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTumelty, R.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-07T17:40:30Z
dc.date.available2012-03-07T17:40:30Z
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier10169952en_US
dc.identifier9000937en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of health & social policy. 1997; 9(1): 23-44.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0897-7186en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J045v09n01_03en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/4775
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link below to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe aged are the heaviest users of physician services. A ageing population and escalation in medical costs have pressured Medicare budgets, which have increased fastest in Part B physician reimbursement. Policy responses include adoption of the Resource Based Relative Value Scale (RBRVS) for physician payment. This paper considers receipt of Medicare revenues by large medical groups and expectations of how groups will fare under RBRVS. In a 73-percent sample of U.S. large group practices, Medicare coverage accounted for one-fourth of clients, Medicare-related revenues for slightly more than one-fourth of revenues, suggesting a slightly higher revenue intensity for Medicare clients, but showing no evidence of truly disproportionate revenues from Medicare users. Medicare shares of revenues are explained by factors related to Medicare clientele and geriatric service provision. Overly-strict Medicare assignment policy may control costs by limiting access to needed care, rather than by limiting overpayments to physicians. Expectations as to how groups will fare under RBRVS are not found to be related to reliance on Medicare, rather to group auspices and ability to contain costs under Medicare payment. The findings are important not only to physician payment under RBRVS but also under health care reform.en_US
dc.format.extent23-44en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Health & Social Policyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJ Health Soc Policyen_US
dc.sourceNLMen_US
dc.subjectResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshData Collectionen_US
dc.subject.meshGroup Practice/economicsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIncome/statistics & numerical dataen_US
dc.subject.meshMedicare Part B/organization & administrationen_US
dc.subject.meshMultivariate Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshPopulation Dynamicsen_US
dc.subject.meshReimbursement Mechanismsen_US
dc.subject.meshRelative Value Scalesen_US
dc.subject.meshUnited Statesen_US
dc.subject.meshGroup Practice/statistics & numerical dataen_US
dc.subject.meshMedicare Part B/statistics & numerical dataen_US
dc.titleMedicare revenue in large medical groupsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.coverage.spacialUnited Statesen_US
dc.description.versionpeer revieweden_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © Routledgeen_US


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