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dc.contributorWichita State University. Department of Public Health Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.authorLong, Michael J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcQueen, David A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBangalore, Vinay Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchurman, John R.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-07T17:40:08Z
dc.date.available2012-03-07T17:40:08Z
dc.date.issued2005-05en_US
dc.identifier15864051en_US
dc.identifier0075674en_US
dc.identifier00003086-200505000-00028en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical orthopaedics and related research. 2005 May; (434): 189-92.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0009-921Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.blo.0000152886.60098.feen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/4753
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link below to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractSelf-assessed health status has been shown to be a powerful predictor of mortality, service use, and total cost of medical care treatment. We investigated the potential for self-assessed health to further serve as a predictor of improvement in health status after a clinical intervention. Using the five-category measure of self-assessed health (excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor), we examined patients' improvements in health status after total knee arthroplasty in each of the WOMAC-defined categories for health status in patients. The results indicate that the greater patients rated their preoperative health, the greater their postoperative improvement. The results suggest that a simple process of asking patients to rate their own health in a presurgery clinic could be a powerful tool in predicting patient outcome. This also suggests that by stratifying preoperative self-assessed health, potential improvements in health status will be more fully captured.en_US
dc.format.extent189-92en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkinen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesClinical Orthopaedics and Related Researchen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesClin. Orthop. Relat. Res.en_US
dc.sourceNLMen_US
dc.subjectComparative Studyen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_US
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Status Indicatorsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshKnee Prosthesisen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshOsteoarthritis, Knee/diagnosisen_US
dc.subject.meshPatient Participationen_US
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Perioden_US
dc.subject.meshPredictive Value of Testsen_US
dc.subject.meshPreoperative Care/methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshProbabilityen_US
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen_US
dc.subject.meshProsthesis Failureen_US
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshSelf Concepten_US
dc.subject.meshSensitivity and Specificityen_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_US
dc.subject.meshOsteoarthritis, Knee/surgeryen_US
dc.titleUsing self-assessed health to predict patient outcomes after total knee replacementen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.coverage.spacialUnited Statesen_US
dc.description.versionpeer revieweden_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2005 Lippincott Williams & Wilkinen_US


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