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dc.contributorWichita State University. Department of Psychologyen_US
dc.contributor.authorKilgore, Kimen_US
dc.contributor.authorSnyder, James J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLentz, Chrisen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-29T16:35:20Z
dc.date.available2012-02-29T16:35:20Z
dc.date.issued2000-11en_US
dc.identifier11081706en_US
dc.identifier0260564en_US
dc.identifierR01 MH57342en_US
dc.identifier.citationDevelopmental psychology. 2000 Nov; 36(6): 835-45.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0012-1649en_US
dc.identifier.issn0012-1649en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://search.proquest.com/docview/614343268?accountid=15042en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/4670
dc.descriptionThe full text of this article is not available in SOAR. WSU users can access the article via commercial databases licensed by University Libraries: http://libcat.wichita.edu/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1324582. The URL of this article is: http://search.proquest.com/docview/614343268?accountid=15042.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe association of parental discipline and monitoring with the early conduct problems of 123 boys and girls was assessed in a highly disadvantaged, African American sample. Prospective analyses indicated that, after earlier conduct problems were controlled for, coercive parent discipline and poor parental monitoring at age 4 1/2 were independent, reliable predictors of age 6 conduct problems for both boys and girls. The association of parental monitoring with later child conduct problems was mediated, in part, by parents' choice of higher risk schools for their children's kindergarten education. The association of family income with child conduct problems was mediated by parental discipline and monitoring. These models are consistent with previous research on older, European American, more advantaged, male samples, which supports the generality of the association of family processes with child conduct problems across child gender, age, and ethnicity.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNIMH NIH HHSen_US
dc.format.extent835-45en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDevelopmental Psychologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDev Psycholen_US
dc.sourceNLMen_US
dc.subjectResearch Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.en_US
dc.subject.meshAfrican Americans/psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshAge of Onseten_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild Behavior Disorders/ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Statisticalen_US
dc.subject.meshParentingen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scalesen_US
dc.subject.meshRisken_US
dc.subject.meshSchoolsen_US
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshUnited Statesen_US
dc.subject.meshChild Behavior Disorders/etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChild Behavior Disorders/psychologyen_US
dc.titleThe contribution of parental discipline, parental monitoring, and school risk to early-onset conduct problems in African American boys and girlsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.coverage.spacialUnited Statesen_US
dc.description.versionpeer revieweden_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2000 American Psychological Associationen_US


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