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dc.contributorWichita State University. Department of Psychologyen_US
dc.contributor.authorKlingsporn, M. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorForce, R. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBurdsal, Charles A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-29T16:35:20Z
dc.date.available2012-02-29T16:35:20Z
dc.date.issued1994-03en_US
dc.identifier8189399en_US
dc.identifier0376332en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Journal of psychology. 1994 Mar; 128(2): 209-26.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-3980en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00223980.1994.9712725en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/4669
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link below to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractMultiple telephone follow-up interviews have been conducted for a number of years for boys with conduct disorders treated at the Saint Francis Academy. These follow-ups are done 2 years and 5 years after treatment completion and again after the boy's 24th birthday. An overall appropriate adult functioning (AAF) score is obtained for each boy contacted. Because the attrition rate is very low, these data provide an opportunity to investigate the stability of treatment effects over time. A substantial attempt was made to investigate the possibility that mean group changes in AAF over time might be due to differential attrition effects. Two separate analyses indicated that an attrition effect was not a major influence in AAF score changes. AAF was relatively stable between the 2- and 5-year follow-ups and showed some improvement.en_US
dc.format.extent209-26en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesThe Journal of Psychologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJ Psycholen_US
dc.sourceNLMen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBias (Epidemiology)en_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild Behavior Disorders/diagnosisen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshJuvenile Delinquency/psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPatient Care Teamen_US
dc.subject.meshPersonality Assessment/statistics & numerical dataen_US
dc.subject.meshPersonality Developmenten_US
dc.subject.meshPsychometricsen_US
dc.subject.meshResidential Treatmenten_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Adjustmenten_US
dc.subject.meshChild Behavior Disorders/psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChild Behavior Disorders/rehabilitation
dc.subject.meshJuvenile Delinquency/rehabilitationen_US
dc.titleTrends in appropriate adult functioning and biasing risks in longitudinal follow-ups of boys with conduct disordersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.coverage.spacialUnited Statesen_US
dc.description.versionpeer revieweden_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 1994 Routledgeen_US


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