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dc.contributorWichita State University. Department of Psychologyen_US
dc.contributor.authorWeiss, Emilyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-29T16:34:48Z
dc.date.available2012-02-29T16:34:48Z
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier12738588en_US
dc.identifier9804404en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of applied animal welfare science : JAAWS. 2002; 5(1): 43-62.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1088-8705en_US
dc.identifier.issn1088-8705en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1207/S15327604JAWS0501_4en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/4649
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link below to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractService dogs are an essential aid to persons with disabilities, providing independence, mobility, and improved self-esteem. Because of these proven benefits, the growing se of service dogs is creating a demand and supply crisis. One major cause is the 50% verage dropout rate for dogs selected for training. Weiss and Greenber (1997) re-cently found that a dog, successful on the most commonly used selection test items, was as likely to be either a poor or a good candidate for service work. The experiment presented here evaluated test items developed by the author in 15 years of experience with dogs. The test items were administered to 75 dogs from the Kansas Humane So-ciety. Once tested, the dogs received obedience and retrieval training. The experiment assessed each dog on behavior over 5 weeks of training versus performance on each selection test item. A subset of the selection items, combined in a regression analysis, accounted for 36.4% of the variance with R = 0.603. This research also revealed a reli-able test for dog aggression without risking injury to dog or tester. Items for testing in-cluded fear, motivation, and submission. Another set of selection items reliably pre-dicted the trait of "high energy" commonly described as "high strung." Future research should involve investigating the effectiveness of both cortisol levels and blood pressure in predicting traits to help strengthen the predictive value of the tool and then testing on dogs trained to be full service dogs.en_US
dc.format.extent43-62en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Applied Animal Welfare Science : JAAWSen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJ Appl Anim Welf Scien_US
dc.sourceNLMen_US
dc.subject.meshAccident Preventionen_US
dc.subject.meshAggression/psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshAvoidance Learningen_US
dc.subject.meshBehavior, Animalen_US
dc.subject.meshBonding, Human-Peten_US
dc.subject.meshConditioning, Classicalen_US
dc.subject.meshConditioning, Operanten_US
dc.subject.meshDisabled Persons/psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDogs/psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFear/psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMotivationen_US
dc.subject.meshSafetyen_US
dc.titleSelecting shelter dogs for service dog trainingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.coverage.spacialUnited Statesen_US
dc.description.versionpeer revieweden_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2002 Sage Publicationsen_US


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