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dc.contributorWichita State University. Department of Psychologyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBohan, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcConnell, Daniel S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChaparro, Alexen_US
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Shelby Glynnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-29T16:34:45Z
dc.date.available2012-02-29T16:34:45Z
dc.date.issued2010-03en_US
dc.identifier20350042en_US
dc.identifier9507618en_US
dc.identifier2010-06152-003en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of experimental psychology. Applied. 2010 Mar; 16(1): 33-44.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1939-2192en_US
dc.identifier.issn1076-898Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0018501en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/4644
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link below to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractModern tools often separate the visual and physical aspects of operation, requiring users to manipulate an instrument while viewing the results indirectly on a display. This can pose usability challenges particularly in applications, such as laparoscopic surgery, that require a high degree of movement precision. Magnification used to augment the view and, theoretically, enable finer movements, may introduce other visual-motor disruptions due to the apparent speed of the visual motion on screen (i.e., motion scaling). In this research, we sought to better understand the effects of visual magnification on human movement performance and control in operating a tool via indirect vision. Ten adult participants manipulated a computer mouse to direct a pointer to targets on a display. Results (Experiment 1) showed that, despite increased motion scaling, magnification of the view on screen enabled higher precision control of the mouse pointer. However, the relative effectiveness of visual magnification ultimately depended on the scale of the physical movement, and more specifically the precision limits of the whole-hand grip afforded by the mouse. When the physical scale of the hand/mouse movement was reduced (Experiment 2), fine-precision control began to reach its limits, even at full magnification. The role of magnification can thus be understood as "amplifying" the particular skill level afforded by the effecting limb. These findings suggest a fruitful area for future research is the optimization of hand-control interfaces of tools to maximize movement precision.en_US
dc.format.extent33-44en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Experimental Psychology. Applieden_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJ Exp Psychol Applen_US
dc.sourceNLMen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshComputersen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLaparoscopyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMotion Perception/physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMovement/physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychomotor Performance/physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTool Use Behavior/physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshVision, Ocular/physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshVisual Perception/physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleThe effects of visual magnification and physical movement scale on the manipulation of a tool with indirect visionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.coverage.spacialUnited Statesen_US
dc.description.versionpeer revieweden_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2010 APAen_US


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