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dc.contributorWichita State University. Department of Psychologyen_US
dc.contributor.authorSnyder, James J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrooker, Monica S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPatrick, M. Reneeen_US
dc.contributor.authorSnyder, Abigailen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchrepferman, Lynn M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStoolmiller, Mikeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-29T16:34:42Z
dc.date.available2012-02-29T16:34:42Z
dc.date.issued2003-11en_US
dc.identifier14669902en_US
dc.identifier0372725en_US
dc.identifierR01 57342en_US
dc.identifier.citationChild development. 2003 Nov-Dec; 74(6): 1881-98.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0009-3920en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.jstor.org/stable/3696310en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/4638
dc.descriptionThe full text of this article is not available in SOAR. WSU users can access the article via commercial databases licensed by University Libraries: http://libcat.wichita.edu/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1381584. The URL of this article is: http://www.jstor.oren_US
dc.description.abstractThe rate at which 266 boys and girls ages 5 to 7 years old were victimized by peers was observed on multiple occasions in kindergarten and first grade. Individual differences in victimization were observed at kindergarten entry and in growth over the subsequent 2 years. Victimization increased for some children but decreased for others. Growth in victimization was reciprocally related to growth in teacher-reported antisocial and depressive behavior for boys. For girls, kindergarten victimization was related to growth in parent-reported antisocial behavior, teacher-reported depressive behavior to growth in victimization, and growth in victimization to parent-reported depression. At a short-term group level, antisocial behavior had a lagged suppressive effect on victimization for boys but a facilitating effect for girls.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipPHS HHSen_US
dc.format.extent1881-98en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesChild Developmenten_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesChild Deven_US
dc.sourceNLMen_US
dc.subjectResearch Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.en_US
dc.subject.meshAggression/psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAntisocial Personality Disorder/diagnosisen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshCrime Victimsen_US
dc.subject.meshDepression/diagnosisen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMarkov Chainsen_US
dc.subject.meshPeer Groupen_US
dc.subject.meshPersonality Assessmenten_US
dc.subject.meshPersonality Developmenten_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Adjustmenten_US
dc.subject.meshAntisocial Personality Disorder/psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDepression/psychologyen_US
dc.titleObserved peer victimization during early elementary school: continuity, growth, and relation to risk for child antisocial and depressive behavioren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.coverage.spacialUnited Statesen_US
dc.description.versionpeer revieweden_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2003 Society for Research in Child Developmenten_US


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