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dc.contributorWichita State University. Department of Psychologyen_US
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Rhonda K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGreen, B. Leeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-29T16:34:41Z
dc.date.available2012-02-29T16:34:41Z
dc.date.issued2000-06en_US
dc.identifier10868815en_US
dc.identifier7600747en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of community health. 2000 Jun; 25(3): 211-24.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0094-5145en_US
dc.identifier.issn0094-5145en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1005156115380en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/4636
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link below to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractPublic health officials and researchers continue to be increasingly concerned about the health of populations of color, especially African Americans. A survey was administered in African American churches in two communities (Wichita, KS and Tuscaloosa, AL) to gather information concerning health behaviors and beliefs and to design interventions that might improve their health status. The study examined the homogeneity of attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors across these samples and to determine the readiness to change using the Transtheoritical Model. Individuals completed a 33-item survey: 6 demographic questions, 12 health behavior questions, 8 health belief questions, 3 church attendance questions, and 4 church-based health promotion program questions. The total sample consisted of 429 respondents. The results showed that 93% of respondents have had their blood pressure checked in the past 2 years. While only 44% indicated eating a high fiber diet during the week. Thirty percent of respondents indicated that their health was dependent on fate or destiny. The findings from this study confirm that among both samples that health attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors need to be changed to lower the risk of certain diseases and disorders. The findings also indicate that both samples have similar beliefs about health that may have important implications for disseminating information to the community. Innovative and culturally sensitive programs are needed in the African American community if disparities in health are to diminish.en_US
dc.format.extent211-24en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Community Healthen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJ Community Healthen_US
dc.sourceNLMen_US
dc.subjectComparative Studyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAfrican Americans/statistics & numerical dataen_US
dc.subject.meshAlabamaen_US
dc.subject.meshAttitude to Health/ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Behavior/ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Education/statistics & numerical dataen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Statusen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshKansasen_US
dc.subject.meshLife Styleen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPopulation Surveillanceen_US
dc.subject.meshReligionen_US
dc.titleAssessing the health attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors of African Americans attending church: a comparison from two communitiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.coverage.spacialUnited Statesen_US
dc.description.versionpeer revieweden_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2000, Springer Netherlandsen_US


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