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dc.contributorWichita State University. Department of Psychologyen_US
dc.contributor.authorShore, Elsie R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBurdsal, Charles A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDouglas, Deanna K.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-29T16:34:38Z
dc.date.available2012-02-29T16:34:38Z
dc.date.issued2008-01en_US
dc.identifier18444027en_US
dc.identifier9804404en_US
dc.identifier790001637en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of applied animal welfare science : JAAWS. 2008 Jan-Mar; 11(1): 63-73.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1088-8705en_US
dc.identifier.issn1088-8705en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888700701729221en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/4632
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link below to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractPrior research has found that dog obedience training and the receipt of advice regarding companion animal (pet) behavior reduce the risk of nonhuman animal relinquishment to an animal shelter and increase human-companion animal interactions, but research also finds that only a minority of pet guardians participates in such activities. The researchers for this study asked 170 dog and cat guardians to assess the seriousness of common problem behaviors and how likely they were to seek help. The researchers also asked them to rate different methods of obtaining expert advice. The dog and cat guardians saw behaviors directly affecting humans as most severe; those involving the destruction of property were next in severity; and those affecting the animal more than the human were least severe. There were no significant differences in ratings by participants' gender or income. Participants indicated they were more likely to use free help options than fee-based services. The lack of a clear correlation between the seriousness of a behavior problem and likelihood of seeking help suggests that other factors may play a role in pet guardians' interest in obtaining expert advice.en_US
dc.format.extent63-73en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Applied Animal Welfare Science : JAAWSen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJ Appl Anim Welf Scien_US
dc.sourceNLMen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBehavior, Animal/classificationen_US
dc.subject.meshBonding, Human-Peten_US
dc.subject.meshCatsen_US
dc.subject.meshDogsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMental Disorders/diagnosisen_US
dc.subject.meshOwnershipen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshReferral and Consultationen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Classen_US
dc.subject.meshMental Disorders/therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshMental Disorders/veterinaryen_US
dc.titlePet owners' views of pet behavior problems and willingness to consult experts for assistanceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.coverage.spacialUnited Statesen_US
dc.description.versionpeer revieweden_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2008 Routledgeen_US


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