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dc.contributorWichita State University. Department of Psychologyen_US
dc.contributor.authorStoolmiller, Mikeen_US
dc.contributor.authorSnyder, James J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-29T16:33:38Z
dc.date.available2012-02-29T16:33:38Z
dc.date.issued2006-06en_US
dc.identifier16784336en_US
dc.identifier9606928en_US
dc.identifier2006-07641-003en_US
dc.identifierR01 57342en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychological methods. 2006 Jun; 11(2): 164-77.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1082-989Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1037/1082-989X.11.2.164en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/4616
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link below to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractMore than 15 years ago, survival or hazard regression analyses were introduced to psychology (W. Gardner & W. A. Griffin, 1989; W. A. Griffin & W. Gardner, 1989) as powerful methodological tools for studying real time social interaction processes among dyads. Almost no additional published applications have appeared, although such data are commonly collected and the applicable questions are central to many important theoretical perspectives. To revisit the basic methods, the authors use an example from emotion regulation theory in which the level of child antisocial behavior is hypothesized to be positively associated with the hazard rate of angry emotions and negatively associated with sad, fearful emotions in the face of parental negative behavior (scolding). The authors discuss the limitations of traditional approaches to the analysis of social interaction and demonstrate improvements in the ability to model individual differences now available in existing software.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipPHS HHSen_US
dc.format.extent164-77en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPsychological Methodsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPsychol Methodsen_US
dc.sourceNLMen_US
dc.subjectResearch Support, N.I.H., Extramuralen_US
dc.subject.meshAntisocial Personality Disorder/psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshEmotionsen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIndividualityen_US
dc.subject.meshInterpersonal Relationsen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Statisticalen_US
dc.subject.meshParent-Child Relationsen_US
dc.subject.meshProportional Hazards Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychometrics/statistics & numerical dataen_US
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshReproducibility of Resultsen_US
dc.subject.meshRisken_US
dc.subject.meshSurvival Analysisen_US
dc.titleModeling heterogeneity in social interaction processes using multilevel survival analysisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.coverage.spacialUnited Statesen_US
dc.description.versionpeer revieweden_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2006 APAen_US


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