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dc.contributorWichita State University. Department of Counseling, Educational and School Psychologyen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchommer-Aikins, Marleneen_US
dc.contributor.authorHutter, Rosettaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-15T21:29:53Z
dc.date.available2012-02-15T21:29:53Z
dc.date.issued2002-01en_US
dc.identifier12022777en_US
dc.identifier0376332en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Journal of psychology. 2002 Jan; 136(1): 5-20.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-3980en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00223980209604134en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/4457
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link below to access the article (may not be free).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe authors investigated the relationship between individuals' beliefs about the nature of knowledge and the nature of learning (epistemological beliefs) and their thinking about everyday controversial issues. Adults (N = 174) ranging in age from 17 to 71 years old with a mean age of 38 completed the Schommer Epistemological Questionnaire (M. Schommer, 1990), which assessed their beliefs in the certainty and organization of knowledge and the speed and control of learning. After they had completed the questionnaire, they responded to a series of questions about two controversial issues that had been discussed in the local newspaper. Regression analyses indicated that the more the participants believed in complex and tentative knowledge, the more likely they were to take on multiple perspectives, be willing to modify their thinking, withhold ultimate decisions until all information was available, and acknowledge the complex, tentative nature of everyday issues. Epistemological beliefs that are heavily influenced by a higher level of education appear to relate to thinking beyond the classroom, and introducing controversial issues into the curriculum may reciprocally foster the development of epistemological beliefs.en_US
dc.format.extent5-20en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge (Taylor & Francis)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Psychologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJ Psycholen_US
dc.sourceNLMen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAttitudeen_US
dc.subject.meshDecision Makingen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshKnowledgeen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshProblem Solvingen_US
dc.subject.meshThinkingen_US
dc.titleEpistemological beliefs and thinking about everyday controversial issuesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.coverage.spacialUnited Statesen_US
dc.description.versionpeer revieweden_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2002, Routledge (Taylor & Francis)en_US


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