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dc.contributor.advisorMcDowell, Kimberly D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFelihkatubbe, Jason M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-15T14:55:19Z
dc.date.available2011-07-15T14:55:19Z
dc.date.issued2011-05-04en_US
dc.identifier.citationFelihkatubbe, Jason M. (2011). Emergent Language and Literacy Skills in Bilingual Preschool Children. -- In Proceedings: 7th Annual Symposium: Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects. Wichita, KS: Wichita State University, p. 73-74en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/3601
dc.descriptionPaper presented to the 7th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects (GRASP) held at the Marcus Welcome Center, Wichita State University, May 4, 2011.en_US
dc.descriptionResearch completed at the Department of Modern & Classical Languages and LIteratures, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose was to determine if a child's proficiency in vocabulary skills in their native language was related to and/or predictive of their proficiency in language and literacy skills in their emerging language. The sample consisted of 115 bilingual (English/Spanish) participants between ages 3 and 5 from Wichita-area Head Starts. The children were tested utilizing standardized formal measures. Tests were administered individually in a counter-balanced order in both languages by trained bilingual research assistants in 2-3 sessions. Results indicated that proficiency in native language vocabulary (Spanish) was not correlated to proficiency in the emerging language vocabulary (English); however, English and Spanish vocabulary skills were statistically correlated with literacy skills. Executive control was correlated with English vocabulary skills but not Spanish, and correlated with literacy skills. To determine if English language/literacy skills were predictive of Spanish vocabulary, a simultaneous multiple regression analysis was conducted. The overall model was significant; F (3, 112) = 13.85, p<.000. Executive control and the literacy skills measure both contributed unique variance to English vocabulary, but Spanish vocabulary did not. The findings provide interesting insight into the relations among native language skills and emerging language skills. This has instructional implications for teachers and policy makers.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWichita State University. Graduate Schoolen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGRASPen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesv.7en_US
dc.titleEmergent language and literacy skills in bilingual preschool childrenen_US
dc.typeConference paperen_US


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