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dc.contributor.authorFeleppa, Robert
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-29T19:20:52Z
dc.date.available2011-03-29T19:20:52Z
dc.date.issued1986-06
dc.identifier.issn0011-3204
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/3457
dc.description.abstractEmic analysis, whether seen as opposed or as complementary to etic modes, is regarded as essential for ensuring that culture-specific particularities are not suppressed in efforts to subsume social phenomena under cross-culturally valid generalizations. Particularly, there is concern that the aim of providing an account of the concepts and principles subjects use to organize reality will be frustrated if alien etic notions function in ethnographic systematization where emic ones should. This paper examines this and other aspects of the emics/etics problem, with particular emphasis on the ostensible function of emic analysis to avoid interpreter imposition of etic categories. It is argued that ethnographic objectivity must acknowledge some degree of imposition but that this does not render emic analysis pointless. Particular emphasis is given to W. V. Quine's idea of the indeterminacy of translation, which seems antithetical to emics but which, with some reconstruction, provides a basis for a viable emic mode.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Chicago Pressen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCurrent Anthropology, Vol. 27, No. 3 (Jun., 1986), pp. 243-255;
dc.rightsArchived on SOAR with publisher's permission.
dc.titleEmics, Etics, and Social Objectivityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPeer reviewed
dc.rights.holderCopyright University of Chicago Press, 1986.


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