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dc.contributor.authorPowell, Jami
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-25T15:24:04Z
dc.date.available2010-10-25T15:24:04Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationPowell, Jami. (2009). Finding our way: Osage ribbonwork and revival. -- Lambda Alpha Journal, v.39, p.12-22en
dc.identifier.issn0047-3928
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/3264
dc.description.abstractRibbonwork, the cutting and sewing of ribbons into geometric patterns, is practiced by various Plains Indian tribes, for example the Osage Nation of Oklahoma. The ribbonwork of the Osage is placed upon traditional clothing, generally worn today for ceremonial activities. Unfortunately, much of the meaning of the patterns and colors of ribbonwork has been lost due to the acculturation of the Osage tribe into more mainstream, Western culture. Today, ribbonwork has become a symbol of the Osage Nation and a marker of pride for its members. The material culture study of ribbonwork uncovers some of its traditional meanings and transformation over time.en
dc.format.extent936921 bytes
dc.format.extent1843 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.languageen_USen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWichita State University. Department of Anthropologyen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLAJen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesv.39en
dc.subjectPlains indiansen
dc.subjectOsageen
dc.subjectRibbonworken
dc.subjectSewingen
dc.subjectCeremonial clothingen
dc.titleFinding our way: Osage ribbonwork and revivalen
dc.typeArticleen


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