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dc.contributor.advisorBohn-Gettler, Catherine M.
dc.contributor.authorMueller, Melinda K.
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-23T15:26:34Z
dc.date.available2010-09-23T15:26:34Z
dc.date.issued2010-04-23
dc.identifier.citationMueller, Melinda (2010). The role of working memory on mood and comprehension. -- In Proceedings: 6th Annual Symposium: Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects. Wichita, KS: Wichita State University, p. 153-154en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10057/3224
dc.descriptionPaper presented to the 6th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects (GRASP) held at the Hughes Metropolitan Complex, Wichita State University, April 23, 2010.en
dc.descriptionResearch completed at Department of Counseling, Educational and School Psychology, College of Educationen
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the relation between emotional experience and working memory, and their effects on reading comprehension processes. Previous research has shown that those with higher working memory feel emotions to the same extent as those with lower working memory, but are better able to suppress emotional responses. Participants were induced to feel a sad, happy, or neutral mood after watching video clips. Although the mood induction was successful, there were no differences based on working memory in the degree to which participants experienced the induced emotions. There was a marginally significant effect in the type of comprehension processes used between high versus low working memory participants as a function of mood.en
dc.format.extent35510 bytes
dc.format.extent1843 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherWichita State University. Graduate Schoolen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGRASPen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesv.6en
dc.titleThe role of working memory on mood and comprehensionen
dc.typeConference paperen


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