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dc.contributor.authorPiros, Hannah
dc.contributor.authorBauman, Amy
dc.contributor.authorClark, C. Brendan
dc.date.accessioned2023-09-11T18:02:20Z
dc.date.available2023-09-11T18:02:20Z
dc.date.issued2023-08
dc.identifier.citationPiros, H., Bauman, A., & Clark, C.B. (2023). An exploration of the link between narcissism, masochism, and crime in a post-incarcerated sample. Journal of the National Medical Association. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jnma.2023.07.008.
dc.identifier.issn0027-9684
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.jnma.2023.07.008
dc.identifier.urihttps://soar.wichita.edu/handle/10057/25744
dc.descriptionClick on the DOI link to access this article (may not be free).
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the relationship between narcissism, masochism, and violent criminal justice involvement. Current interventions used with offender populations target traits such as antisocial personality but typically ignore narcissism and masochism. Understanding the connection between violent crime, narcissism, and masochism can help us develop a more indepth understanding of which personality features contribute to an increased proclivity towards criminal action. The participants ($N$ = 494) were post-incarcerated individuals. To assess individuals' degree of narcissistic and masochistic thinking, the Narcissistic Personality Inventory and the underserving self-image subscale of the Self-Defeating Interpersonal Style Scale were administered via a Qualtrics survey. Basic demographic information, psychopathy, intelligence, and personality were also measured and controlled for in the analyses. A logistic regression indicated that high levels masochistic thinking were associated with violent criminal justice involvement, even when relevant covariates were controlled for. High levels of narcissism were not found to exhibit a statically significant relationship with violent criminal justice involvement when psychopathy was controlled for. These findings suggest that masochistic characteristics may be a potential target for treatment in rehabilitating offenders.
dc.language.isoen-US
dc.publisherNational Medical Association
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of the National Medical Association
dc.subjectCriminal justice
dc.subjectMasochism
dc.subjectNarcissism
dc.subjectPost-incarceration
dc.subjectRecidivism
dc.titleAn exploration of the link between narcissism, masochism, and crime in a post-incarcerated sample
dc.typeArticle
dc.rights.holder© Copyright 2023 National Medical Association


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