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dc.contributor.advisorCluff, Kim
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Luke
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-20T16:31:28Z
dc.date.available2022-06-20T16:31:28Z
dc.date.issued2022-05
dc.identifier.othert22023
dc.identifier.urihttps://soar.wichita.edu/handle/10057/23464
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.)-- Wichita State University, College of Engineering, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering
dc.description.abstractCarbon dioxide $(CO_2)$ in the blood has the potential to cause severe health detriments as well as milder cognitive effects if its concentration increases to unsafe amounts- typically either through environmental exposure or conditions affecting the respiratory system in one way or another. Astronauts, in particular, are prone to this exposure due to high ambient $CO_2$ levels aboard spacecraft and have reported some symptoms due to $CO_2$ exposure which aren’t always able to be identified as such without blood $CO_2$ monitoring. Current state-of-the-art monitoring methods like arterial blood gas analysis and capnography are limited mostly to clinical settings due to requiring invasive procedures, operator training, or bulky equipment- and aren’t practical for use aboard spacecraft. Recent studies have investigated the usage of radiofrequency (RF) resonant sensors to measure health diagnostics noninvasively- and such a sensor could potentially address this gap quite well. This thesis focused on determining if a spiral resonator would be capable of detecting changes in dissolved gas $CO_2$ due to the gas’s effect on the electromagnetic properties of water. In order to do this, a benchtop model was developed to control the amount of $CO_2$gas dissolved in water which was then measured using the spiral resonator sensor. A significant correlation between negative shifts in the sensor’s resonant frequency and an increase in dissolved $CO_2$ gas was measured, with an R2 value of 0.923. While the detection of $CO_2$ in blood will pose other challenges in accounting for factors like pulsatile blood flow and changes in other parts of blood content and discerning their effects from those of $CO_2$, this work still demonstrates the potential of this methodology to be used as a noninvasive blood gas $CO_2$ sensor.
dc.format.extentxiii, 55 pages
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWichita State University
dc.rights© Copyright 2022 by Luke Richardson All Rights Reserved
dc.subject.lcshElectronic dissertations
dc.titleDetection of dissolved $CO_2$ gas using an RF resonant sensor
dc.typeThesis


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