Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorLanning, Katie
dc.contributor.authorOverman, Blake A.
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-20T16:31:28Z
dc.date.available2022-06-20T16:31:28Z
dc.date.issued2022-05
dc.identifier.othert22019
dc.identifier.urihttps://soar.wichita.edu/handle/10057/23460
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)-- Wichita State University, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Dept. of English
dc.description.abstractLiterary monsters, the embodiments of human fear and anxiety, have existed in narratives for as long as stories have been told. Traditionally the monster is an antagonistic force, but what happens when the audience begins to understand or even identify with monstrous characters—especially when that monster exhibits some level of queerness? By analyzing multiple narratives that feature a monstrous protagonist, I hope to track the evolution of the monster as an empathetic figure. Works such as the medieval poem Bisclavret by Marie de France and the Victorian novel The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson are narratives that feature monstrous characters that work to establish a level of empathy with non-monstrous readers. My thesis frames this discussion with a specific focus on critical monster theory in tandem with queer theory and narratology—specifically how monsters’ function as aberrations of gender and sexuality allow us to understand the cultural significance of these monsters and how the narration of a text might alter the perception of the reader.
dc.format.extentv, 58 pages
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWichita State University
dc.rights© Copyright 2022 by Blake Overman All Rights Reserved
dc.subject.lcshElectronic dissertations
dc.titleFrom the eyes of monsters: Literary transformative monsters as agents of empathy
dc.typeThesis


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record